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Allied Health Sciences

General guide to assist Allied Health Sciences students and faculty at RSU.

The Explore RSU Libraries box on the library's website searches the entire library collection including books, databases, audiovisual materials and government publications.

These databases will be the most relevant for allied health sciences. 

 


Scholarly v. Popular Sources

If you are not familiar with scholarly publications, it can be difficult to tell the difference between scholarly and popular periodicals. There are no definitive rules for distinguishing between the two, but here are some guidelines:

Scholarly (e.g., academic journals):

  • Are written by professionals within an academic field or discipline.
  • Contain research projects, methodology, and theory.
  • Have few, if any, advertisements.
  • Use college-level or specialized vocabulary of the discipline.
  • Include articles with extensive bibliographies, footnotes, or other documentation.
  • Contain graphics that are often black & white and consist of tables, charts, and diagrams.
  • Are peer-reviewed or refereed.

Popular (e.g., magazines, newspapers):

  • Are written by journalists.
  • Contain general news articles written to inform, update, or introduce a new issue.
  • Have many full-color, full-page advertisements.
  • Use a general, non-technical vocabulary.
  • Include articles with little or no documentation.
  • Contain graphics that are often full-color pictures and illustrations.

Most books and other items in the library are organized by the Library of Congress Call Number system. In that system, the basic sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, etc.) are under Q and medicine is under R.

Book related directly to Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Athletic Training are in the RMs, while the rest of the Rs are other aspects of medicine. Anatomy and Physiology are considered part of basic science, and are in the QMs and QPs, respectively. Some of immunology and infectious disease resources are in QR (microbiology) You'll find medical materials in the Main Circulating Stacks (3rd floor).

Here are the subjects associated with specific call numbers, in case you'd like to browse. However, if you are looking for something specific, searching the library catalog is usually quicker.

  • QM Human anatomy
  • QP Physiology
  • QR Microbiology
  • R Medicine (General)
  • RA Public aspects of medicine
  • RB Pathology
  • RC Internal medicine
  • RD Surgery
  • RE Ophthalmology
  • RF Otorhinolaryngology
  • RG Gynecology and obstetrics
  • RJ Pediatrics
  • RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology

Subclass RM

RM695-893 Physical medicine. Physical therapy

        Including massage, exercise, occupational therapy, hydrotherapy, phototherapy, radiotherapy, thermotherapy, electrotherapy

RM930-931 Rehabilitation therapy

RM950 Rehabilitation technology

Search Strategies

Did you know that when you enter an entire sentence into Google it searches each.. word.. individually? That's why you get millions of results back! Luckily Google does a decent job of returning relevant results from a sentence. Unlike Google, databases can't understand an entire sentence. You will need to break your topic down into the most important ideas, or keywords. Even Google will give you better results if you use relevant keywords!

Exclude irrelevant words

When using the databases, you should exclude all extraneous words from your searches. First, leave out all articles (a, and, the) in your search. Next, narrow your search terms down to two or three words that describe exactly what you hope to find For example, if you are writing a paper about the theme of discrimination in Frankenstein, narrowing your search terms down to discrimination and Frankenstein will likely retrieve a manageable list of more precise results.

Select and refine search terms

After you have selected your initial search terms, list any synonyms or related terms that might be relevant to your topic. For example, if your search terms are Frankenstein and discrimination, you might want to try synonyms such as "prejudice" or "intolerance" in place of discrimination. You may even replace discrimination with a related term, such as "inhumanity." Successful searches are often the result of trying out a variety of terms. Most databases will provide you with suggestions of additional or alternate search terms to use, which can lead you to better results in a shorter amount of time.

Once you've broken down your research topic into keywords you can start searching more in-depth using filters and other search tools. The boolean operators andor, & not can help you combine keywords to retrieve results directly related to your topic. Boolean operators are like a type of filter and can be used in just about any search bar, including databases and Google! 

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Most library databases have built in search tools such as filters.

Here are some useful filters:

  • Peer-Review - Limits your search to scholarly journal articles
  • Publication Date - Limit your search to resources published within a specific time frame
  • Full Text Online - This ensures all results are available to read in full. 
  • Content Type - Limits your search to just one content type such as journal articles or books
  • Subject Terms - These are like official hashtags. Select them to find sources about that subject.

You can also view the Advanced Search for more filters and tools!